News Category: education


CHASP at SXSWEDU and SXSW 2020

Aug. 12, 2019

Help ensure our CHASP Faculty Fellows and The University of Texas at Austin have a strong presence at next year's SXSW and SXSWEdu Conference and Festival! They have several captivating proposals that need your vote during the public voting PanelPicker process, which ends Friday, August 23rd.

You don't need to attend to vote, and all you have to do is choose "VOTE UP" via the links below.

Dr. Paul von Hippel: Is Summer Learning Loss Real?

June 5, 2019

In a new article for Education Next, Paul von Hippel of the LBJ School at The University of Texas at Austin reexamines the evidence around summer learning loss. He finds that the study most widely used to support claims of summer learning loss, at more than 30 years old, is based on outdated test-scoring methods. More recent and better-scored tests indicate that achievement gaps are unlikely to widen during students’ summer vacations. Read more (LBJ School).

Perspectives Blog > Beyond the Classroom: Health Services in Schools and How They Pay for Them

May 29, 2019

Beyond the Classroom: Health Services in Schools and How they Pay for It. By Anna Gu, Center for Health and Social Policy Ambassadorfilled with phlegm. I was managing not only my own cycle of sore throats and stomach bugs, but also those of the class – twenty-two small bodies with individual allergies, behavioral ticks, and swiss-cheese holes of attendance gaps.

Perspectives Blog > Addressing the Student Debt Crisis: Federal vs. State Solutions

May 22, 2019

Addressing the Student Debt Crisis: Federal vs. State Solutions. By Megan Kruse, Center for Health and Social Policy AmbassadorAccording to the National Center for Education Statistics, the number of students projected to enter colleges and universities in Fall 2018 was 19.9 million.

Perspectives Blog > Texas Public School Finance: The Special Education Struggle

April 18, 2019

Texas Public School Finance: The Special Education Struggle.  By Lynn Murphy, Center for Health and Social Policy AmbassadorThe state of special education in Texas is grave. Following federal investigation, Texas was found to be in violation of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) in January 2018.

Perspectives Blog > Affirmative Action by a Different Name: How Sports Helped Me Get into Harvard

Dec. 19, 2018

Affirmative Action by a Different Name: How Sports Helped Me Get into Harvard. By Melissa Bellin, Center for Health and Social Policy Ambassador. ​Most students apply to Harvard. As an athlete, Harvard applied to me. When I was 17, I received a hand-written letter from the Harvard hurdles coach. He had followed my high school track career, and he asked me to consider applying in the fall. I remember staring at the letter, dumbfounded.

New Book from Dr. Jennifer Holme: A Regional Equity Framework for Urban Schools

Sept. 13, 2018

CHASP Faculty Fellow and Associate Professor of Educational Policy and Planning at The University of Texas at Austin College of Education, Jennifer Jellison Holme, Ph.D., and her colleague Dr. Kara Finnegan (University of Rochester) take a look at the causes of educational inequality at the regional level in their new book, Striving in Common: A Regional Equity Framework for Urban Schools.

See below for full Abstract. 

Dr. Paul von Hippel on Rating Teacher Preparation Programs

July 5, 2018

In efforts to address teacher quality, policymakers have focused on the preparation program where teachers receive their education and training. Despite a repeal of a short-lived federal rule requiring each state to assess and rank their teacher preparation programs (TPP), almost half are still ranking their programs. But what does the research say about evaluating TPPs based on the impact, or value-added, of their graduates on student learning?

Dr. Paul von Hippel on Impact of Teacher Preparation Programs on Student Achievement

June 12, 2018

CHASP faculty associate Dr. Paul von Hippel’s new paper, Are Schools (Still) a Great Equalizer? Replicating a Summer Learning Study Using Better Test Scores and a New Cohort of Children (Social Science Research Network), reexamines the debate among sociologists about whether or not schools have an effect on inequality and if they in any way serve as equalizers for children.

Dr. Paul von Hippel on Schools’ Effect on Inequality

Sept. 11, 2017

CHASP faculty associate Dr. Paul von Hippel’s new paper, Are Schools (Still) a Great Equalizer? Replicating a Summer Learning Study Using Better Test Scores and a New Cohort of Children (Social Science Research Network), reexamines the debate among sociologists about whether or not schools have an effect on inequality and if they in any way serve as equalizers for children.

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