Miguel Pinedo, Ph.D.

CHASP Faculty Fellow Dr. Miguel Pinedo

College of Education-Kinesiology and Health Education

Miguel Pinedo is an Assistant Professor in Department of Kinesiology and Health Education at The University of Texas at Austin College of Education. He has an invested interest in better understanding the intersection between migration and health.

Though migrant health has become an important facet of health research, migration has rarely been examined as a social determinant of health. Pinedo's work addresses this critical area by focusing on how different migration experiences contribute to health disparities, particularly among Latino populations. Specifically, his work investigates how social- and structural-level factors associated with migration to the US; voluntary and forced migration (e.g., deportation); domestic migration within Mexico; and migration to high-risk environments (e.g., settings with increased availability of alcohol and drugs) relate to the epidemiology of substance abuse, HIV risk, and related harms. A large proportion of his work has focused on Mexican migrants residing on both sides of the US-Mexico border, a high-risk region for alcohol and drug abuse and HIV. Overall, his research underscores the importance of migration-related factors in shaping health behaviors, risk practices, and health outcomes.



Prior to joining UT, Pinedo received his PhD in Global Health from the UC San Diego and completed his postdoctoral training at UC Berkeley. He also previously earned his Master in Public Health from UC Berkeley.

Research:

  • Acculturation and alcohol use: the role of environmental contexts - This study will examine if and how the relationship between acculturation and alcohol use disorders (AUD) differs by environmental contexts among Mexican-origin adult participants.
  • Barriers to specialty substance abuse treatment services - This pilot study aims to gain greater understanding of barriers to specialty substance abuse treatment; 2) to compare barriers to specialty substance abuse treatment by race/ethnicity; and 3) using findings from Aims 1 & 2, to develop a new quantitative scale to assess barriers to specialty substance abuse treatment.
  • Understanding Areas of Concentrated Alcohol and Drug Problems at the US-Mexico Border - This Research Project extends analyses of the US-Mexico Study of Alcohol and Related Conditions (UMSARC), a large epidemiological study conducted from 2011-13 that targeted the border region and sampled both the US and Mexico. Project aims are to better characterize, contextualize, and explain the observed geographic variation across UMSARC sites toward a better understanding of how and why substance use problems cluster in some, but not all, border areas. 

Publications:

  • Pinedo, M., Zemore, SE., Cherpitel, CJ. & Caetano, R. (2017). Acculturation and alcohol use: the role of environmental contexts. Handbook of Acculturation and Health. Oxford University Press (pp. 239). Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. (View)
  • Pinedo, M., Beletsky, L., Alamillo, N. & Ojeda, VD. (2017). Health-damaging policing practices among persons who inject drugs in Mexico: Are deported migrants at greater risk?. International Journal of Drug Policy(46), 41–46. (View)
  • Pinedo, M., Kang Sim, E., Espinoza, RA. & Zuñiga, ML. (2015). An exploratory study of internal migration and substance use among an indigenous community in Southern Mexico. Family & Community Health1(39), 24–30. (View)
  • Pinedo, M., Burgos, JL., Vargas-Ojeda, A., Fitzgerald, DS. & Ojeda, VD. (2015). The role of visual markers in police victimization among structurally vulnerable persons in Tijuana, Mexico. International Journal of Drug Policy26(5), 501–508. (View)
  • Pinedo, M., Burgos, JL. & Ojeda, VD. (2014). A critical review of social and structural conditions that influence HIV risk among Mexican deportees. Microbes and Infection5(16), 379–390. (View)
  • Pinedo, M., Burgos, JL., Robertson, AM., Vera, A., Remedios, L. & Ojeda, VD. (2014). Perceived risk of HIV infection among deported male injection drug users in Tijuana, Mexico.. Global Public Health4(9), 436–454. (View)
  • Pinedo, M., Campos, Y., Leal, D., Fregoso, J., Goldenberg, SM. & Zuñiga, ML. (2014). Alcohol use behaviors among indigenous migrants: A transnational study on communities of origin and destination. Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health(16), 348–355. (View)
  • Pinedo, M.., Campos, Y.., Leal, D.., Fregoso, J.., Goldberg, S. M.. & Zuñiga, M. L.. (2014). Alcohol use behaviors among indigenous migrants: A transnational study on communities of origin and destination. Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health(16), 348–355.
  • Pinedo, M.., Zenire, S. E.., Cherpitel, C. J.. & Caetano, R.. (n.d.). Acculturation and alcohol use: the role of environmental contexts. Handbook of Acculturation and Health.
Contact Information
Phone:
Fax number:
512-232-6252
Location:

2315 Red River Street
Austin, Texas 78712

Mailing address:

P.O. Box Y
Austin, Texas 78713-8925